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Posts for: May, 2020

ReducingTeethGrindingLeadstoBetterSleepandBetterDentalHealth

We all need a good night's sleep, both in quantity and quality. That's why the Better Sleep Council promotes Better Sleep Month every May with helpful tips on making sure you're not only getting enough sleep, but that it's also restful and therapeutic. The latter is crucial, especially if you have one problem that can diminish sleep quality: nocturnal teeth grinding.

Teeth grinding is the involuntary movement of the jaws outside of normal functioning like eating or speaking. You unconsciously grind teeth against teeth, increasing the pressure of biting forces beyond their normal range. It can occur while awake, but it is more common during sleep.

The habit is fairly widespread in children, thought to result from an immature chewing mechanism. Children normally outgrow the habit, and most healthcare providers don't consider it a major concern.

But teeth grinding can also carry over or arise in adulthood, fueled in large part by stress. It then becomes concerning: Chronic teeth grinding can accelerate normal age-related tooth wear and weaken or damage teeth or dental work. It may also contribute to jaw joint pain and dysfunction related to temporomandibular disorders (TMD).

If you notice frequent jaw tenderness or pain, or a family member says they've heard you grind your teeth at night, you should see us for a full examination. If you are diagnosed with teeth grinding, we can consider different means to bring it under control, depending on your case's severity and underlying causes.

Here are some things you can do:

Alter lifestyle habits. Alcohol and tobacco use have been associated with teeth grinding. To reduce episodes of nighttime teeth grinding, consider modifying (or, as with tobacco, stopping) your use of these and related substances. Altering your lifestyle in this way will likely also improve your overall health.

Manage stress. Teeth grinding can be a way the body “lets off steam” from the accumulated stress of difficult life situations. You may be able to reduce it through better stress management. Learn and practice stress reduction techniques like meditation or other forms of relaxation. You may also find counseling, biofeedback or group therapy beneficial.

Seek dental solutions. In severe cases, there are possible dental solutions to reducing the biting forces generated by teeth grinding. One way is to adjust the bite by removing some of the structure from teeth that may be more prominent than others. We may also be able to create a bite guard to wear at night that prevents teeth from making solid contact with each other.

These and other techniques can be used individually or together to create a customized treatment plan just for you. Minimizing teeth grinding will help ensure you're getting the most out of your sleep time, while protecting your dental health too.

If you would like more information about treatment for teeth grinding, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teeth Grinding.”


By Stiles Family Dentistry
May 11, 2020
Category: Oral Health

Good oral hygiene does not simply mean brushing your teeth. It also encompasses a range of various oral habits that you should do daily. Besides visits to your dentist here in Stiles Family Dentistry at Salem, NH, for cleanings and checkups, developing good oral hygiene habits and routines to maintain your oral health is a must.

Do You Practice Proper Oral Hygiene Habits?

Here are tried and true oral hygiene practices you can follow to keep your smile healthy and bright:

  • Practice the proper way of brushing your teeth. Your toothbrush should be held at an angle, bristles directed to the area where your teeth and gums meet. The brush should move in a circular, back and forth motion. Make sure to brush for two minutes, including your tongue, the outside, and inside surfaces of your teeth. Use a soft-bristled brush and fluoride toothpaste.
  • Brush two times a day -- in the morning and at night.
  • Use fluoride-containing products. Fluoride helps prevent tooth decay and gum disease.
  • Remember to floss. Flossing is just as vital as brushing your teeth. Doing this can stimulate the gums, lessen plaque, and likewise decrease inflammation in the area.
  • Gargle with mouthwash. Rinsing your mouth with mouthwash could help re-mineralize the teeth, lessen mouth acidity, and clean hard-to-reach spaces in your mouth.
  • Keep yourself hydrated with plain water. Drinking water could rinse off leftover debris from the food you consumed. It likewise keeps your mouth moist, which lessens the buildup of plaque, reduces your risk of developing cavities and gum disease, and benefits your overall health.
  • Lessen your consumption of acidic and sugary foods. These types of foods could wear down the teeth enamel and cause decay.
  • If you use tobacco-containing products, stop. These could discolor your teeth and pose a negative impact on your overall health.

Is Your Mouth Healthy?

Various signs could tell you if you’ve been taking proper care of your mouth, such as the following:

  • Your gums are a healthy-looking, pink, and feel firm to the touch.
  • Your teeth are set securely in your gums and don’t wriggle.
  • Your gums are fit firmly throughout your teeth.
  • Your teeth are clear of stained or damaged areas.
  • Your teeth are shiny.

When Should You See Your Dentist?

The American Dental Associations strongly recommends that you schedule a meeting with your dentist at Salem, NH, at least twice a year for professional cleanings and oral health exams. Beyond that, you should see your dentist whenever you have a dental emergency.

For More Tips on Caring for Your Oral Health, Contact Us

Dial (603) 893-4538 to arrange an appointment with one of our dentists here at Stiles Family Dentistry in Salem, NH.


ThinkTwiceBeforeConsideringBotoxforChronicJawPainRelief

Chronic jaw pain can be an unnerving experience that drains the joy out of life. And because of the difficulty in controlling it patients desperate for relief may tread into less-tested treatment waters.

Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are a group of conditions affecting the joints connecting the lower jaw to the skull and their associated muscles and tendons. The exact causes are difficult to pinpoint, but stress, hormones or teeth grinding habits all seem to be critical factors for TMD.

The most common way to treat TMD is with therapies used for other joint-related problems, like exercise, thermal (hot and cold) applications, physical therapy or medication. Patients can also make diet changes to ease jaw function or, if appropriate, wear a night guard to reduce teeth grinding.

These conservative, non-invasive therapies seem to provide the widest relief for the most people. But this approach may have limited success with some patients, causing them to consider a more radical treatment path like jaw surgery. Unfortunately, surgical results haven't been as impressive as the traditional approach.

In recent years, another treatment candidate has emerged outside of traditional physical therapy, but also not as invasive as surgery: Botox injections. Botox is a drug containing botulinum toxin type A, which can cause muscle paralysis. Mostly used in tiny doses to cosmetically soften wrinkles, Botox injections have been proposed to paralyze certain jaw muscles to ease TMD symptoms.

Although this sounds like a plausible approach, Botox injections have some issues that should give prospective patients pause. First, Botox can only relieve symptoms temporarily, requiring repeated injections with increasingly stronger doses. Injection sites can become painful, bruised or swollen, and patients can suffer headaches. At worst, muscles that are repeatedly paralyzed may atrophy, causing among other things facial deformity.

The most troubling issue, though, is a lack of strong evidence (outside of a few anecdotal accounts) that Botox injections can effectively relieve TMD symptoms. As such, the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has yet to approve its use for TMD treatment.

The treatment route most promising for managing TMD remains traditional physical and drug therapies, coupled with diet and lifestyle changes. It can be a long process of trial and error, but your chances for true jaw pain relief are most likely down this well-attested road.

If you would like more information on treating jaw disorders, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Botox Treatment for TMJ Pain.”